Trees are only shipped to: Webb, Hidalgo, Cameron, Willacy, Brooks, Starr, Kenedy, Jim Hogg, Kleberg, and Nueces Counties. Orders from any other county or state will be canceled.

Simple Steps On How to Plant A Navel Orange Tree Successfully

Growing a Navel orange tree is easier than you may think. When you plant an orange tree the right way, it produces super sweet fruit. Learn how below!

Are you interested in growing Navel oranges at home?

Think of the wonderful fruit you could grow naturally and efficiently without ever having to pay for oranges at the store again. Doesn't that sound nice?

The good news is that it is much easier than you might think to plant and grow a Navel orange tree indoors or outdoors on your own property.

If you want to learn how to produce your own Navel oranges, keep reading to find out how to get started and how to maintain your orange tree.

Planning to Plant a Navel Orange Tree

There are critical characteristics to remember when trying to find a good spot for your new Navel orange tree.

Some of the factors to consider before you plant it are:

  • Soil - Soil must be fertile and well-draining. The best option would be a soil that consists of organic matter, clay, and dirt.
  • Timing - Plan to plant your orange tree between early and middle spring to allow them time to root with warm weather available.
  • Location - A sunny area of the property without grass is the perfect spot for an orange tree because they love warm weather. Don't be afraid to plant your tree near your concrete patio either because the reflected heat will help the tree.
  • Position - The hole you plant needs to be twice as big as the tree's root ball so they can spread. The root ball top should be 1 inch above the soil because it will settle into the ground after the tree becomes more established.

You can always change your landscape to help it match what your orange tree will need as well, but it is best to do this before you plant the tree.

How to Grow Oranges Fast

You should know that oranges are not going to pop up on your tree right away. It takes time!

The best way to make your oranges grow faster is to take care of your tree. On average, it can take about five months before you see ripe fruit on the tree. It will flower, become a green or yellow fruit, and then mature into the fruit you love.

Once all the green is no longer visible on the fruit and it is sweet on the inside, you know the fruit is ripe. A great thing about Navel orange trees is that they continue producing fruit every year!

Can You Grow a Tree in a Pot?

Yes! You can grow a Navel orange tree in a container if you live in an area that wouldn't be good for a tree of this type outside.

The trees grow to be about 4-6 feet tall, so as long as you have space, you can even grow these trees indoors.

Make sure you have a container that has good drainage and is at least 5 to 15 gallons. In addition to this, find soil that is a good mixture of natural elements, such as your favorite potting soil.

Don't forget to water your tree, but don't overwater. If this happens, you can see the leaves wilt. Taking the tree outside for a while and letting the soil drain for a day helps to fix this problem.

If your tree is indoors, you still need sunlight. Full sun exposure is best, but a growing light would work as well. At least 6 hours of sunlight is good for these tropical trees.

Maintaining Your Tree

When your orange tree is still pretty new, you need to water it regularly and water it deeply. Your soil as far as 5 or 6 inches down needs to be moist.

Another thing to remember is that fertilization of the tree during the growing season can help it become healthier.

Don't add fertilizer to the hole when you plant the tree because it may damage the roots. Look for a fertilizer that has high nitrogen levels for citrus and apply the fertilizer around, but not touching, the trunk.

Ready to Plant?

By taking care of your Navel orange tree, you are ensuring delicious and healthy Navel oranges year after year!

If you want to learn how citrus fruits can benefit you, check out our blog to discover a wide array of useful growing tips, insights, and citrus recipes.

Growing Trees is fun, and every tree we send comes with a 20-page care guide.

1 comment

  • This article is informative and a good starting point. I live in hardiness zone 6b which takes you all the way up to Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Oranges are one of my favourite fruits and they can be expensive to buy. So for fun I thought I would try growing them indoors. So far I have eight seedlings growing robustly in a south east facing window. They started sprouting from their seed casings at the end of July. Here we are three weeks later and they are growing there first true leaves. The plan for these young seedlings is to grow them indoors between October to end of May in my climate. Then grow them on my deck in pots from June to end of Sept when there is no risk of frost. Our temperatures are any where from plus 57.2’F to 77’F during the spring and summer.

    If you have any other suggestions that might help this experiment along that would be great.

    Thank you,

    Cheryl Clark

    Cheryl Clark

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published